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Full text of "Wayside Inn front door diaries"

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MRS. WILLIAM H. SPICER, CHAIRMAN" OF OUR MARKETING 
COMMITTEE, IN HER GARDEN, WHICH WAS LANDSCAPED 
BY ERNEST M. STANTON. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEE F. REDMAN. 







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THE WAYSIDE INN— 1860 



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THE DELIGHTFUL HOTEL STATLER, DETROIT, WHERE OUR BIG ANNUAL MEETING FOR 1930 WILL BE HELD 










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Woman's National 
Farm and Garden Association 



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Jjjrngram 

Annual Meeting : Detroit, Michigan 

November 6 — 7 — 8 
1930 



NOTE— i Please be SURE to faring your MEMBERSHIP CARD 
for registration purposes. 

2. Kindly do not mail money with your reply. 



//JL. 



IJrogram 

ANNUAL MEETING— DETROIT, MICHIGAN 

NOVEMBER 6, 7, 8, 1930 

Headquarters — *Hotel Statler 



mfodtwobag 

November 5 10:00 a. m 

11 :oo a.m 



Executive Board Meeting 
Committee Meetings 
2. :00 p.m. - Council Meeting 

(This day's sessions for Council and Committee Members only) 



©bttrauag 

November 6 8:00 a.m. - Registration 

10:00 a. m.-n :30 p.m. Business session 

2. :oo p.m. — 5 :oo p.m. Business session 

9:00 p.m. - Formal reception and old- 

fashioned dance at Hotel 
Statler, as guests of the 
Michigan Division 

November 7 10:00 a. 111.-11:30 p.m. Business session and elec- 
tion of officers 



1 :oo p.m. 



#atttrbai| 

November 8 



Luncheon at Hotel Stat- 
ler (price $1.50), followed 
by business session 



9:30 — 10:30 a.m. Meeting of new Council 
at Greenfield Village 

10:30 a.m. — 12. :30 p.m. Visit to Greenfield Vil- 
lage, and luncheon, as 
guests of Mrs. Henry Ford 
All members invited 

*Rooms will be available for three dollars, up 
Reservations should be made directly with hotel office 



(ttninmittee in rljargp nf arrangements : 

Mrs. E. R. Bryant, Dearborn, Mich. - Chairman 

Miss Clara Snow, Mrs. William H. Spicer, 

Dearborn, Mich. Grosse Pointe. Mich. 

Mrs. W. D. Thompson, Birmingham, Mich. 



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Election of officers, council members 
and a nominating committee. 



2. 

Acceptance of reports of officers and 
standing committees. 



The following items of business are 
recommended for action : 

(a) To make the Special Committee on Marketing 
a Standing Committee. 

(b) To create a Standing Committee on Exhibits. 

(c) To create a Standing Committee on Lectures. 

(d) To make an appropriation for the Liaison 
Committee of the International Federation of 
Rural Women's Organizations. 

(e) To make a new contract with the publishers of 

"Home Acres." 

(0 To make an appropriation for a field worker. 



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Olives 



nts 



Salted Nuts 



Barley Soup 



Celery 
/side Inn Grown) 



Roast Stuffed Turkey with Giblet Gr 
lyside Inn ed) 



Potatoes Carrots Bee 

Inn Grown) 

Hot Biscuits 

nberry Sauce 

Hearts of Lettuce 

Pumpkin Pie 

; Inn Grown Pumpkins) 

Plum PuQuing with Cream Sauce 

Plymouth Vermont Cheese 

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lyside Inn Vvater Ground Corn Meal) 

Cider 

(From Lde Inn Farm) 



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Xjeft — On October 21, the 
fifty-first anniversary of 
the invention of the in- 
candescent electric light 
by Thomas A. Edison was 
commemorated in the re- 
stored Menlo Par\ laboratory at DearbornA 
Francis Jehl, who alone survives today {aside] 
from Mr. Edison himself) of the group I 
present when the invention was completed, I 
brought to life for a moment the replica of the I 
first lamp, first lighted by Mr. Edison fiim.sel/1 
one year ago in the presence of Herbert! 
Hoover and Henry Ford. In the picture Mr. I 
Jehl is shown with students and men from the I 
Edison Institute. I 

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Processional 



Pro lo pile 



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Onward Christian Soldiers 



First Prophecy 

It Came Upon a Midnight Clear 



Second Prophecy 



The Angel Appears to Mary 
Third Prophecy 



Little Town of Bethlehem 



Fourth Prophecy 

YJrile Shepherds hatched 

An Angel Appears to Shepherd; 



Choir 

George Johnson 

Choir and Audience 

Thomas Hogan 

Choir 

Joseph Ochedowski 

Mrs. Boyer 

George Hill 

Miss Monahan 

George Hill 

Choir 



Silent Nlrht 



Fifth Prophecy 

Three Kings Come to the Manger 



Thomas Marge liar 
William Bridges 

Michael Srodulski 

Robert Cleveland 
Y.illiam Bridges 
Earl Stoddard 



Epilogue 

Once In Royal David's City 



Nicholas Giovinette 



Choir 



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THE TOY SHOP 

by 

Percival Wilde ( 

Presented by 

THE REDSTONE SCHOOL 

of 

The Wayside Inn 



Scene 

A Toy-shop on Christmas 

eve. 

Time 

Quarter of twelve at night 



CHARACTERS 



Bobby 
Betsy 

Masked Doll 
Pierrot Doll 
Wooden Soldier 
French Doll 
Sailor Doll 
Rag Doll 



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Rubber Dog 
Jaok-in-the-Box 



The Drum 



Dad 



Mother 



Storekeeper 
Policeman 



James Geahan 

Pay Barnard 

Ann Very 

Betty Boyer 

Alvin Bradshaw 

Lydia Bonazzoli 

Wilfred Spiller 

Mary Bartlett 

Caroline Way 

Bradley Way 

Wilbert Tighe 

David Bentley 

Joyce Belcher 

Emma Batchelder 

Allen Bo wry 



THE BIRDS' 



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CHRISTMAS CAROL 



by 

Kate Douglas Wiggin 



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Presented by 



THE SOUTHWEST SCHOOL 



of 



The Wayside Inn 



CHARACTERS 



SCENES 

PROLOGQE--A Little Snow-Hi rd 

The outside of the Bird house, 
the Ruggles dwelling, and the 
church beside it, on a snowy 
Christmas morning. 



ACT I. The Birds' Nest 

Carol Bird's Fairy-Story room 
on a December afternoon twelve 
years later. 






THE BIRD FAMILY 

Carol Bird, the "Snow-Bird 11 grown up 

Ruth Stone 
Mrs. Bird, her mother, Esther Miller 
Mr. Donald Bird, her father, 

William Roby 
Uncle Jack. Robert, Spiller 

■ Elfrida Clifford, Carol's nurse, 

Madeline Torry 
The Butler John Merrill 

THEIR NEIGHBORS, THE RUG'iLES IN THE REAR 



ACT II. Some of the Birds are taught 
to fly. 

Christmas in the Ruggles Kitchen 



ACT III. The Angles of the Crutches 
Christmas evening in the Fairy- 
Story room. 






s. Ruggles, who was a-fcG-Ill, 

Virginia Bowry 



Sarah Maude 

Peter 

Peoria 

Kitty 

Clement 

Cornelius 

and 
Larry 



Doris Seymour- 
Ivan Stone 
Jane Way 
Virginia El lms 
Parker Bart let t 
Donald Bowry 

Thomas Win ship 



ANGELS OF THE PROLOGUE 
Yvette Harrington 
Earbara King 



Eleanor Stone 



Eleanor Goulding 
Josephine Torry 



MUSIC BETWEEN ACTS 



Ann Dove 



Barbara Morton 



John Bunker 



Francis Johnson 



Albert Martin 



Ralph Stone 



John Winship 



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Next Door to Ye Old Wayside Inn 

Modern Roadside Market in Old Time Building 



NEW ENGLAND'S latest 
agricultural asset is at Sud- 
bury, Massachusetts ; Road- 
side Market No. 1, approved by the 
Woman's National Farm and Gar- 
den Association. It may also be the 
first roadside market in New Eng- 
land to bear the New England Qual- 
ity sign, another symbol of quality 
and standardization. But that is an- 
other story. 

This story is about the effort of 
Mrs. Henry Ford and 
other enthusiastic and 
able women to give a 
demonstration 
of what a rightly 
located, properly 
equipped and ably 
managed roadside 
>tand can do to solve 
the great problem of 
marketing high grade 
locally grown prod- 
ucts of the farm. 
Another similar mar- 
ket with sign No. 2 
of the approval of 
the Association will 
soon be established 
near Mrs. Ford's 
home in Dearborn. 
Michigan. It is the hope and ex- 
pectation of the leaders of the 
Woman's National Farm and Gar- 
den Association that these two model 
roadside markets will be the fore- 
runners of a network of Mich mar- 
kets all over the United States. 
It's just another good thing being 
tried out first in New England for 
the benefit of the rest of the country. 

This first of all roadside markets 
to receive the stamp of approval of 
the national association is near the 
historic Wayside Inn. a shrine in his- 
tory, in literature and in the hearts 
of New Englanders wherever they 
may have roamed. Well known it is 
that Henry Ford back in 1925 pur- 
chased the historic Wayside Inn and 
by restoration assured that for all 
time it would remain as nearly as 
it was in the old days as is possible 
in these modern times. It is true that 



high powered cars tear along over 
the Boston Post road instead of the 
lumbering old coaches. But an old- 
fashioned mill wheel is turning there, 
sheep graze by the roadside and 
much of the charm of the old Inn is 
brought back for the pleasure of this 
and of future generations. Not so 
well known is the chain of events 
that were set in motion by Mr. 
Ford's interest in the historic land- 
mark and in the community sur- 




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BILL PARMF.XTER S STORE 

rounding it. The original purchase. 
was like a stone thrown into a still 
pool and starting ripple after ripple 
to lap on the shores of the whole 
countryside. This roadside market 
is but one of these many ripples. 
reaching shore just in time to be re- 
corded in this book. 

The market was developed and is 
carried on by the management of the 
Wayside Inn project, which em- 
braces many things besides the mill 
itself. The special interest of the 
Woman's National Farm and Gar- 
den Association in this market comes 
through its president, Mrs. Ford. 

Let's go back to the old days just 
a bit before we begin on the new. 
The general store of Bill Parmenter. 
erected before the revolutionary war 
at the cross roads in Sudbury Cen- 
ter, carried a little bit of everything, 
gingham and fish hooks, apples and 



crockery, stove polish and nails, and 
more. Here you found wisdom crisp 
and slow, news of the day. politics 
and gossip, all heard around the air 
tight stove. Bill Parmenter, who kept 
the store for 50 years, was born at 
the Wayside Inn. The lower floor 
was originally the "Center" school, 
and for a time it contained the Post 
Office. In 1929 it was purchased and 
moved to its present location on the 
Boston- Worcester Post Road. 

It is in connection 
with this old store, 
now restored to its 
old form, cracker 
barrel and all, that 
the new roadside 
market is conducted. 
Not often does the 
old join hands with 
the new so strik- 
ingly or so pleasantly. 
Here, just a bit aside 
from the "little bit 
of everything" on the 
store shelves as in 
the old days, may be 
found the very best 
which the new days 
can offer ; fruits 
and vegetables from 
neighboring farms, jellies and jams 
put up by the skilled hands of 
women trained by the Middlesex and 
Worcester County Extension Serv- 
ices, blankets made from the wool 
of Massachusetts sheep, honey, and 
the handicraft of many women. It's 
all new. all put up and displayed in 
accordance with the highest stand- 
ards of the present day, yet into 
eVery jelly jar, rug or package of 
fruit has gone the same pride of in- 
dividual workmanship and care that 
was characteristic of the old days of 
Xew England craftsmanship. It is 
the essence of old Xew England at 
its best, expressed in terms of mod- 
ern day ideals and needs. Very re- 
freshing it is. in this machine-made 
age, to find this fine handwork. 

There is a very practical side of 

the market too. Everything that is 

(To Page 70) 




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70 j :- 

Next Door to Ye Wayside Inn 

(From Page 29) 

offered for sale there, whether it is 
home-made brown bread or blankets, 
is purchased outright from the maker 
and resold on a business basis. The 
price paid to the makers brings 
money into many a farm home. The 
market furnishes an outlet for the 
work of many a woman and brings 
her a return ranging from mere pin 
money to a quite substantial income. 
Right there is where Roadside Mar- 
ket No. 1 at the Wayside Inn. also 
No. 2 at Dearborn, will fit in per- 
fectly with the program of the 
Woman's National Farm and Gar- 
den Association. One of the chief 
aims of the association is to provide 
a profitable outlet for the things 
which farm women can make in 
their homes. In New England the 
association has about 1700 members. 
These women are organized in a 
branch which has for many years 
done pioneer work in finding mar- 
kets for home products, raising 
standards, improving home condi- 
tions and broadening the horizon of 



New England farm women without 
number. 

All over the United States there 
are other women with similar hopes 
and aspirations, who rejoice in mak- 
ing things themselves and who could, 
if they had a fair market for what 
they produced in their homes, turn 
their spare time into dollars. If you 
talk with any of these earnest as- 
sociation leaders who are back of 
this new movement you will find 
them looking, not at just those two 
demonstration markets, but into the 
future when the whole nation will 
be studded with similar markets, 
each bearing the sign "Approved by 
the Woman's National Farm and 
Garden Association." It will be the 
fulfillment of a vision they have had 
for many years. 

The demonstration market has a 
large significance because of the 
women who serve as its officers. 
They are: President, Mrs. Ford; 
vice-presidents, Mrs. Howard W. 
Lewis of Pennsylvania, Mrs. W. G. 
Jones. Jr., of New York, Mrs. 
George U. Crocker of Massachu- 
setts ; recording secretary, Mrs. 



The Tercentenary 

A. M. Hume of Melrose, Mass.; 
corresponding secretary. Miss Jane 
L. Hicks of Dearborn. Mich. ; execu- 
tive committee, Mrs. Ford, Mrs. 
Hume, Mrs. Herbert B. Hosmer of 
Boston, Mrs. William H. Spicer of 
Grosse Point, Mich., Mrs. Charlotte 

B. Ware of Boston. Other prominent 
women connected officially with the 
organization are Miss Florence 
Ward of the U.S.D.A., Mrs. Frank 
A. Seiberling of Akron, O., and Mrs. 
Francis King of South Hartford, 
N. Y. 



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Ford Stirs Up Europe 

Condensed from the Review of Reviews (December, '30) 
Jonathan Mitchell 

Former member of the London Bureau of the New York "World" 

MR. HENRY FORD is wage levels — and they are 

even more talked of "real" wages, in terms of food, 

abroad than he is in the clothing, etc. — for the four great 

United States. Many thoughtful European powers and America to 

Europeans are becoming afraid of be as follows (Great Britain is ar- 

him. They have begun to wonder bitrarily taken as equal to 100 

whether "fefordisme" is not des- units): 

tined to alter Europe beyond .,. .. 

r J United States 197 

recognition. Great Britain 100 

About a year ago Mr. Ford Germany 77 

announced that he would pay the itTly" 5 i 

equivalent of Detroit wages in 

each of his twenty-odd European These figures have appeared in 

factories and assembly plants. the official International Labor 

The International Labor Office Review. But they are read almost 

at Geneva (a semi-independent exclusively by economists. And 

branch of the League of Nations), because of the immense popular 

volunteered to find out for Mr. fame of Henry Ford in Europe, it 

Ford exactly how much this was certain that the figures of any 

would amount to in pounds and inquiry to which his name was 

francs, marks and lire. attached, even though they were 

The big manufacturers' asso- similar to these I. L. O. figures, 

ciations of Europe immediately would be published by every 

raised a tremendous fuss. Several European newspaper, and seized 

governments, notably Italy and upon by countless radical agita- 

Spain, endeavored to have the tors. 

investigation killed. It was not All Europe, at present, is in the 

that the wage scales were un- throes of a class struggle which 

known. In point of fact, the in its savage bitterness is unlike 

I. L. O. had in its possession a anything we in this country have 

great mass of figures on compara- ever experienced. Violent strikes 

tive wage levels, which it had are frequent. In England, Ger- 

been collecting over a number of many, France and other countries 

years. The most recent figures of the question of wages, as a politi- 

the I. L. O. show comparative cal fighting issue, overshadows 

© 1930, Review of Reviews Corp., 55 Fifth Ave., N. T. C. 775 




■ 



everything else. In every country, 
manufacturers and their political 
spokesmen assert that wages are 
already too high, and that any 
further increase would be na- 
tional suicide. 

Mr. Ford has cut the ground 
from under the feet of these man- 
ufacturers. His cheerful willing- 
ness to double, triple, quadruple 
and even quintuple the wages of 
his European workmen makes 
him, in the eyes of the radical 
leaders, a living proof that Euro- 
pean capitalists could perfectly 
well grant higher wages if it were 
not for their greediness and in- 
competency. 

Investigators went last winter 
into the homes of ioo selected 
Ford employes in Detroit. Each 
of the workmen interrogated re- 
ceived Mr. Ford's minimum $J a 
day. "It was found," says the 
report, "that the typical family 
lived in a four- or five-room house 
or apartment, with inside bath, 
inside toilet, inside running water, 
kitchen sink and sewer connec- 
tion. There was one room or more 
per person. All houses were 
lighted by electricity, and in 
most of them cooking was done 
on modern gas ranges." 

In places like Antwerp and 
Warsaw, investigators have re- 
ported plaintively that in factory 
neighborhoods the "five-room 
house or apartment" of America 
does not exist. "One room or 
more per person" is undreamed 



of. In order to live on a Detroit 
scale, workmen would be forced 
to move into upper class neigh- 
borhoods. 

In a dozen such ways, the Ford 
workman will violate the cus- 
tomary traditions of Europe. 
Take the matter of clothes. In 
Europe you can tell a workman 
merely by looking at his clothes, 
and this fact is a great help in 
maintaining Europe's iron class 
distinctions. It enables the white 
collar class to preserve a magnifi- 
cent solidarity. In an English 
public house, there is one door 
for white collared drinkers, and 
another for the proletariat. 
In France, street cars, sub- 
ways, buses have one section for 
white collars, and one for blue 
smocks. 

The new Ford employe con- 
stitutes a formidable portent. 
He will be able to wear a white 
collar to and from his work, and 
it will be possible for a marquis 
to rub elbows with him without 
knowing it. He will be able to 
send his children to the universi- 
ties. The sons and daughters of 
automobile mechanics may be- 
come professors, lawyers, and 
statesmen. 

More immediate is the fact that 
Ford employes, if they live up to 
the Detroit budget, will all own 
automobiles. This is perhaps the 
most terrifying thing of all. The 
motor car is the greatest class 
leveler. A working man, traveling 



T T. 



his horn, will lose all sense of that 
obsequiousness which is due his 
betters. 

The brilliant and delightful 
historian, M. Andre Siegfried, de- 
clares hopefully that the intro- 
duction of American wages and 
methods into Europe is incon- 
ceivable. "We can admire Ford," 
he says, "but we feel he is far re- 
moved from our ways." Mass 
production, he believes, can never 
succeed in Europe. The only an- 
swer to this is that American 
wages and methods have proved, 
and are proving, immensely suc- 
cessful in Europe. 

It is the almost prohibitive 
European tariff on automobiles 
which has impelled Mr. Ford to 
set up his semi-autonomous Ford 
companies abroad, in England, 
France, Germany, Ireland and 
Italy. The distinctive thing about 
these companies is that nearly all 
of them are owned, at least theo- 
retically, by the citizens of the 
country in which they are located. 
Thus 51 percent of the British 
Ford Company is owned by Eng- 
lishmen living in England. All 
these companies employ local 
workers, and their executives, for 
the most part, are natives. Sir 
Percival Perry, head of the Brit- 
ish Ford Company, is an English- 
man, and a well-known one. No 
American materials are used by 



panies except when, as with 
speedometers, American products 
are very much the cheapest. 

The reason why the Ford com- 
panies abroad are successful — 
the reason why they are making 
profits - — is that they are employ- 
ing the ideas worked out in this 
country by the Ford chemists, 
metallurgists, mechanical engi- 
neers, technicians of every kind. 
When Europeans buy Ford cars, 
they are paying money for these 
ideas. What Mr. Ford is doing is 
exporting not the product of 
American brawn, but the product 
of American brains. 

This is a revolutionary step in 
the business world. International 
trade in the past has usually con- 
sisted in the exchange of material 
objects. Now Mr. Ford is export- 
ing ideas, and many observers be- 
lieve that American commercial 
technique will become in the next 
few years one of the principal 
exports of the United States. This 
kind of export is profitable both to 
ourselves and to Europe, but it 
easily arouses the hostility of 
European business men. The 
heads of American corporations 
with companies abroad bear a 
tremendous responsibility. Upon 
the manner in which these com- 
panies are operated will depend 
the relations between our conti- 
nent and that of Europe. 







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